Publications

Negotiating Software Contracts for Enterprise Resource Planning

Law Technology News
09.27.12

Chances are, if you’re in-house counsel at a large company, sooner or later your IT group will ask you for legal input on an enterprise resource planning implementation or a software development project. If you don’t know what ERP or software development projects entail, you’re not alone. Since these projects come along only every few years, not many lawyers have deep experience with them. Also, many lawyers are uncomfortable with IT terminology and don’t often negotiate complex IT agreements. Here are tips on how to avoid disasters.

ERP implementation: An IT buzzword for 15 years, ERP describes software devoted to managing business and accounting functions that may include some, or all, of these components: human relations management, financial management systems, customer relations management, supply chain management, product lifecycle management and business intelligence. Oracle Corp., SAP America Inc., and Microsoft Corp. dominate the ERP market, but other companies also provide ERP products.

ERP software must be customized for a specific customer’s unique business and accounting operations. ERP software vendors don’t implement and install the ERP software — that job is provided by an ERP implementor. Four of the larger ERP implementors are Xerox Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co., IBM Corp., and Dell Inc.

Read More.

The publications contained in this site do not constitute legal advice. Legal advice can only be given with knowledge of the client's specific facts. By putting these publications on our website we do not intend to create a lawyer-client relationship with the user. Materials may not reflect the most current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This information should in no way be taken as an indication of future results.

Search Tips:

You may use the wildcard symbol (*) as a root expander.  A search for "anti*" will find not only "anti", but also "anti-trust", "antique", etc.

Entering two terms together in a search field will behave as though an "OR" is being used.  For example, entering "Antique Motorcars" as a Client Name search will find results with either word in the Client Name.

Operators

AND and OR may be used in a search.  Note: they must be capitalized, e.g., "Project AND Finance." 

The + and - sign operators may be used.  The + sign indicates that the term immediately following is required, while the - sign indicates to omit results that contain that term. E.g., "+real -estate" says results must have "real" but not "estate".

To perform an exact phrase search, surround your search phrase with quotation marks.  For example, "Project Finance".

Searches are not case sensitive.

back to top