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How to Understand Social Media Evidence

E-Commerce Times
01.02.13

Pew Research reports that more than 65 percent of all adults used social media every day in 2011 — up from 61 percent in 2010. This expansive use of social media has created new sources of evidence. So for lawyers to best assist their clients they must better understand social media and how their clients share information on the internet.

You don’t need to devote hours every day to posting tweets and commenting on Facebook. But to get a better understanding of how social media works, you should spend some amount of time creating a Facebook page, Twitter account, and LinkedIn connections and learn to communicate via text messaging as well as use whatever other web tools your clients use.

Before you begin these activities, read the ToS and the privacy policy for each site. Yes, really. It’s probably an accurate guess that only about 1 percent of internet users read either.

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The publications contained in this site do not constitute legal advice. Legal advice can only be given with knowledge of the client's specific facts. By putting these publications on our website we do not intend to create a lawyer-client relationship with the user. Materials may not reflect the most current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This information should in no way be taken as an indication of future results.

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