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Can the DoD Really Provide Cybersecurity?

04.28.15

Given the scale of cyberattacks from foreign governments and criminals one may really wonder if the DoD (Department of Defense) can really protect the US, but with The DoD Cyber Strategy report issued in April 2015 we now have a better idea about what the DoD is doing. The report includes these statements:

We are vulnerable in this wired world. Today our reliance on the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of data stands in stark contrast to the inadequacy of our cybersecurity.

The Internet was not originally designed with security in mind, but as an open system to allow scientists and researchers to send data to one another quickly.

Without strong investments in cybersecurity and cyber defenses, data systems remain open and susceptible to rudimentary and dangerous forms of exploitation and attack.

Malicious actors use cyberspace to steal data and intellectual property for their own economic or political goals.

DoD set the following "five strategic goals for its cyberspace missions":

  1. Build and maintain ready forces and capabilities to conduct cyberspace operations;
  2. Defend the DoD information network, secure DoD data, and mitigate risks to DoD missions;
  3. Be prepared to defend the U.S. homeland and U.S. vital interests from disruptive or destructive cyberattacks of significant consequence;
  4. Build and maintain viable cyber options and plan to use those options to control conflict escalation and to shape the conflict environment at all stages;
  5. Build and maintain robust international alliances and partnerships to deter shared threats and increase international security and stability.

Time will tell if the DoD can really protect the US from cyberattacks.

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