Blogs

Google Wins! No Class Action Suit for Monetizing Gmail Content

03.24.14

A court ruled that Gmail users consented to Google’s monetization of Gmail content ended the class action lawsuit since “consent must be litigated on an individual, rather than class-wide basis.” The class action suit filed in 2011 In Re Google Gmail Litigation was dismissed “with prejudice,” which means the plaintiffs cannot revise its complaint with new claims, as ordered on March 18, 2014 by US District Judge Lucy Koh (Northern District of California).

Bloomberg said that “the amount at stake could have reached into the trillions of dollars” for violation of the Federal Wiretap Act and called Google’s win:

…a major victory in its fight against claims it illegally scanned private e-mail messages to and from Gmail accounts, defeating a bid to unify lawsuits in a single group case on behalf of hundreds of millions of Internet users.

Judge Koh’s ruling will likely adversely affect the related Yahoo! class action webmail litigation for Yahoo!’s monetization of webmail content. Stay tuned for the next battleground on this Gmail case in the appellate courts.

The publications contained in this site do not constitute legal advice. Legal advice can only be given with knowledge of the client's specific facts. By putting these publications on our website we do not intend to create a lawyer-client relationship with the user. Materials may not reflect the most current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This information should in no way be taken as an indication of future results.

Search Tips:

You may use the wildcard symbol (*) as a root expander.  A search for "anti*" will find not only "anti", but also "anti-trust", "antique", etc.

Entering two terms together in a search field will behave as though an "OR" is being used.  For example, entering "Antique Motorcars" as a Client Name search will find results with either word in the Client Name.

Operators

AND and OR may be used in a search.  Note: they must be capitalized, e.g., "Project AND Finance." 

The + and - sign operators may be used.  The + sign indicates that the term immediately following is required, while the - sign indicates to omit results that contain that term. E.g., "+real -estate" says results must have "real" but not "estate".

To perform an exact phrase search, surround your search phrase with quotation marks.  For example, "Project Finance".

Searches are not case sensitive.

back to top