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Identity Theft Tops the List for 2014 Tax Scams

02.24.14

Each year IRS compiles a list of the “Dirty Dozen” “tax scams, reminding taxpayers to use caution during tax season to protect themselves against a wide range of schemes.” IRS Commissioner John Koskinen added these comments:

Taxpayers should be on the lookout for tax scams using the IRS name…These schemes jump every year at tax time. Scams can be sophisticated and take many different forms. We urge people to protect themselves and use caution when viewing e-mails, receiving telephone calls or getting advice on tax issues.

Here are the “Dirty Dozen” Tax Scams for 2014:

  1. Identity Theft
  2. Pervasive Telephone Scams
  3. Phishing
  4. False Promises of “Free Money” from Inflated Refunds
  5. Return Preparer Fraud
  6. Hiding Income Offshore
  7. Impersonation of Charitable Organizations
  8. False Income, Expenses or Exemptions
  9. Frivolous Arguments
  10. Falsely Claiming Zero Wages or Using False Form 1099
  11. Abusive Tax Structures
  12. Misuse of Trusts

Consumers should be wary of these cyber threats all the time, and not just of tax season.

The publications contained in this site do not constitute legal advice. Legal advice can only be given with knowledge of the client's specific facts. By putting these publications on our website we do not intend to create a lawyer-client relationship with the user. Materials may not reflect the most current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This information should in no way be taken as an indication of future results.

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