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Twitter Accepts Jurisdiction of French Court

07.15.13

Rather than fight French jurisdiction Twitter provided information regarding the identity of posters who allegedly violated French law by posting hate speech. After the French court issued an Order in January, 2013 requiring information about the identity of the posters, Twitter considered what course of action to take since Twitter’s Terms of Service (ToS) specifically state that California has exclusive jurisdiction. The New York Times reported:

...in response to a valid legal request, Twitter has provided the prosecutor of Paris, Presse et Libertés Publiques section of the Paris Tribunal de Grande Instance, with data that may enable the identification of certain users that the Vice-Prosecutor believes have violated French law.

Since the EU has recently asserted jurisdiction over Google’s servers, Twitter’s acquiesce to French jurisdiction will likely strengthen the EU’s jurisdiction claims overs Internet businesses in the US.
 

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