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Google’s Android Operating System Now Target of EU Antitrust Charges

04.09.13

FairSearch.org filed a complaint with the EU asserting that Google’s use of the Android operating system dominates the mobile marketplace and is anticompetitive. FairSearch states that it “is an international coalition of 17 specialized search and technology companies whose members include Expedia, Microsoft, Nokia, Oracle, and TripAdvisor.” In the complaint FairSearch states:

Google is using its Android mobile operating system as a ‘Trojan Horse’ to deceive partners, monopolize the mobile marketplace, and control consumer data,... Failure to act will only embolden Google to repeat its desktop abuses of dominance as consumers increasingly turn to a mobile platform dominated by Google’s Android operating system.

Google clearly dominates the search market as Forbes reported that according to eMarketer “that Google controls 56% of the mobile ad market and 96% of its search ad segment,” and Strategy Analytics reported that Android’s share of the global smartphone market has surged from 51% to 70% by the end of 2012.

So given the fact that the EU already investigating antitrust charges against Google this may make things worse for Google, so stay tuned to see how Google fares.

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