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Millions of Apple Device IDs Published – FBI Security Breached?

09.05.12

Computerworld reported that a hacker group published what it “claims is about 1 million unique device identifier numbers (UDIDs) for Apple devices that it said it accessed earlier this year from a computer belonging to an FBI agent.” The report went on to explain that “Apple’s UDIDs are a set of alphanumeric characters used to uniquely identify an iPhone or iPad. The numbers are designed to let application developers track how many users have downloaded their application and to gather other information for data analytics.”

A member of AntiSec, a splinter of the Anonymous hacking collective, claims it culled more than 12 million UDIDs and personal data from the FBI, and published 1 million to prove its work. A consultant at Sophos, said there is no way of knowing yet whether the hackers are telling the truth. "We don’t have any way of confirming the source of the data, or what else might have been taken, but it does appear that the files do contain at least some genuine Apple UDIDs."

The FBI has no comment on this report. But if this report is true, the big question is – why does the FBI have millions of Apple UDIDs?
 

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