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Apple v. Samsung – No Infringement in Japan

08.31.12

Just to show how unpredictable patent infringement cases are, a week after Apple’s massive $1+ billion verdict against Samsung in California, a Tokyo Judge ruled that Samsung did not infringe a different Apple patent. Computerworld reported that Tokyo District Judge Tamotsu Shoji ruled on August 31, 2012 that Samsung did not infringe Apple’s “patent for synching smartphones and tablets with media devices.” Samsung issued this statement following the ruling:

We welcome the court’s decision, which confirmed our long-held position that our products do not infringe Apple’s intellectual property. We will continue to offer highly innovative products to consumers, and continue our contributions towards the mobile industry’s development.

Clearly the US Apple v. Samsung patent court battles will rage on for a long time, but given the ruling in Japan one should not assume that Apple will prevail on all patent claims.
 

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