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Did you Notice? LinkedIn Revised its User Agreement

09.02.11

LinkedIn boasts +120 million members who all agree to be bound to their User Agreement, but few LinkedIn members noticed that on June 16, 2011 the LinkedIn User Agreement changed. LinkedIn’s new User Agreement is not radically different from previous versions. However since the LinkedIn User Agreement binds +120 million members world-wide it seems that these members would want to know that members expressly agree that they will comply with Section 10 B “Don’t Undertake the following” including (without limitation):

1. Act dishonestly or unprofessionally by engaging in unprofessional behavior by posting inappropriate, inaccurate, or objectionable content to LinkedIn;

2. Publish inaccurate information in the designated fields on the profile form (e.g., do not include a link or an email address in the name field). Please also protect sensitive personal information such as your email address, phone number, street address, or other information that is confidential in nature;

5. Invite people you do not know to join your network;

6. Upload a profile image that is not your likeness or a head-shot photo;

How many people violate LinkedIn’s User Agreement every day? If LinkedIn terminates members for violating the User Agreement they run the risk they become ostracized from an important Social Media network, so one would think it important to read the User Agreement!

What does your business do to protect itself from bad behavior on your website? Do your terms of service comport with your business and the visitors to your website?

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