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Prosecutor Charges Husband with Crime for Reading Wife’s eMails!

01.13.11

While a Michigan couple was married the husband and wife shared a computer and the husband had access to his wife’s email password.... but according to the Detroit Free Press he ex-husband has now been charged with a felony for looking at his ex-wife’s emails. 

Should it be a crime or divorce court dispute for the husband to view his wife’s gmail?

My February 2011 Technology Law Column in the eCommerce Times has the complete story, including the comments of nationally recognized criminal defense lawyer Barry Sorrels (the current President of the Dallas Bar Association). 

Barry and I were interviewed on Fox News about this case and he “wondered if this "type of matter was the highest and best use of the criminal justice system…. There are more serious matters."

What do you think?

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